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    Palm Beach Atlantic University
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
Graduate & Pharmacy Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

The School of Nursing


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Joanne Masella, Ed.D., Dean
Debi Morgan, D.N.P., Associate Dean for Graduate Nursing
Linda, Gibson-Young, D.N.P., Chair of Nurse Practitioner Program

Associate Professors

  • Christina Carsello, D.N.P.
  • Linda, Gibson-Young, D.N.P.
  • Jennifer Kuretski, D.N.P.
  • Deborah Morgan, D.N.P.

Assistant Professors

  • Jill Shutes, M.S.N

Mission

The mission of Palm Beach Atlantic University School of Nursing is to prepare graduates for a life of service in the profession of nursing within a Christ-centered environment incorporating intellectual, professional, and spiritual integrity.

The SON plans to seek accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) for the MSN and DNP programs.

Core Values

Christ-centered

Christ is at the center of everything the School of Nursing does. "He [Christ] is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross." – Colossians 1:17 – 20 (NIV)

Servant Leader

PBA prepares students for lifelong learning and leadership. We strongly believe that leadership begins with being a servant. "Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave—just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. – Matthew 20:26 – 28 (NIV)

Ministry of Caring

Caring for the sick is not simply an act of goodness, but an act of worship and obedience, taking part in Christ's ministry of reconciliation. "We are therefore Christ's ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us." – 2 Corinthians 5:20 (NIV)


Empathy for: Empathy leads to action: "Jesus stopped and called them. 'What do you want me to do for you?' he asked. 'Lord,' they answered, 'we want our sight.' Jesus had compassion on them and touched their eyes. Immediately they received their sight and followed him." – Matthew 20:32-34 (NIV)


Connection to: Our common humanity binds us together. "When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come along with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in spirit and troubled." – John 11:33 (NIV)


Being with: Sometimes simply being with another is more important than doing for them: "But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, 'Lord, don't you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!' 'Martha, Martha,' the Lord answered, 'you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.'" – Luke 10:40-42 (NIV)

Holistic approach

Health involves much more than mere physical wellness or even psychological well-being. Health includes socio-cultural and spiritual aspects as well, and nurses must take them into account. "What good is it for a man to gain the whole world, yet forfeit his soul?" – Mark 8:36 (NIV)

Professionalism

PBA is dedicated to excellence. PBA Nursing expresses that excellence through dedication to professionalism. It is not enough to simply feel empathy or compassion, or even act on them. Caring must be competent, tempered by learning, experience, and judgment. "I was sick and you looked after me…I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me." – Matthew 25:36,40 (NIV)

Master of Science in Nursing Program

The School of Nursing (SON) offers the MSN based on national standards set forth in the American Association of College of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing and the Quality Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Competencies.

MSN Program Outcomes

The MSN Program Mission is to prepare graduates for advanced nursing practice with specific functional and clinical abilities with a Christ-centered focus.

The MSN Program Goals are:

  • Provide master's nursing education that builds on a baccalaureate nursing foundation.
  • Prepare graduates for advanced nursing practice with specific functional and clinical abilities.
  • Prepare graduates for doctoral studies in nursing.

Based the MSN Program Goals the MSN Program Expected Student Outcomes are:

  • Synthesize theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts, sciences, humanities, Christian faith to support ethical decision making for optimal health outcomes.
  • Apply organizational and systems leadership principles to strengthen nursing practice and healthcare delivery.
  • Analyze research and scholarly activities that support evidence based practice, nursing education, clinical practice, and healthcare organization.
  • Analyze technology and information systems to improve healthcare quality and safety clinical prevention and population health.
  • Analyze healthcare policy to improve patient and community health outcomes.
  • Develop collaborations with leaders in nursing and other disciplines to improve the quality of professional nursing practice and health outcomes.
  • Practice nursing at the Master's level.

MSN – Healthcare Leadership (MSN-HSL) Key Features

  • The MSN-HSLprogram designed is to prepare nurses with a baccalaureate in nursing for positions of leadership and management. A Health-Systems leader can enter a health system/practice environment and diagnose systems level problems, develop evidence based improvement plans, implement them, and evaluate their effectiveness.
  • Graduates will be eligible to sit for the ANCC (American Nurses Credentialing Center) Nurse Executive certification, the AONE (American Organization of Nurse Executives) Certified Executive Nurse Program (CENP), or the AONE Certified Nurse Manager and Leader (CNML). (Work experience also required for certification.)
  • MSN-HSL curriculum provides a minimum of 320 leadership practice hours.
  • Emphasis is on identifying real world problems, designing and implementing evidence based quality improvement plans, and evaluating their effectiveness.
  • The MSN-HSL program requires 36 credits over semesters. Part time schedules may be available on a space available basis.
  • BSN-DNP students may earn an MSN in Health Systems Leadership upon completing all of the requirements of the MSN-HSL degree. DNP Practicum I and II will substitute for the MSN -HSL Clinical courses.
Final Project

As part of NUR 6143 Advanced Nursing Practicum II, students will complete an evidenced-based, quality improvement plan addressing an area of concern in at their practicum site.  Students must write a manuscript suitable for publication to complete the course.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

The School of Nursing (SON) offers the DNP based on national standards set forth in the American Association of College of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) Core Competencies, and the Quality Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Competencies.

DNP Program Outcomes

The mission of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program is to prepare experts in specialized advanced nursing practice with a Christ-centered focus.

The program goals of the DNP program are:

  • Provide doctoral nursing education that builds on prior nursing education.
  • Prepare graduates for enhanced knowledge and skills in a specialized area of practice.
  • Develop graduates as leaders within the healthcare community, implementing a Christian worldview.

Based on the DNP Program Goals, the expected student outcomes of the DNP program are:

  • Synthesize theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts, sciences, humanities, Christian faith to support ethical decision making for optimal health outcomes.
  • Advocate healthcare policy at all levels to improve patient and community health outcomes.
  • Collaborate with leaders in nursing and other disciplines to improve the quality of professional nursing practice, outcomes, and the healthcare system.
  • Synthesize evidence-based practice, organizational leadership, and technology to support quality improvement in clinical prevention and population health.
  • Practice advanced nursing for complex populations.

DNP Program Tracks

The SON offers two DNP Tracks: Family Nurse Practitioner and Degree Completion for advanced practice nurses.

DNP Family Nurse Practitioner Track (DNP - FNP)

  • The DNP-FNP track prepares graduates to be eligible for Family Nurse Practitioner certification and licensure.
  • The DNP-FNP curriculum provides a minimum of 1100 clinical practice hours.
  • The DNP-FNP program requires 74 credits over nine semesters. A full time student should complete the program in three years.
  • Applicants must hold a bachelor's or master's degree in nursing.
  • Graduates of the PBA Master of Science in Nursing Health Systems Leadership Program (MSN-HSL) may transition seamlessly transition to the BSN-DNP if the graduate GPA is 3.2 or higher.  An interview is required for if lower GPAs.

Degree Completion Track  (Post-Master's DNP)

  • The Post-Master's DNP track is for those who already hold a master's degree in advance practice nursing (nurse practitioner, midwife, anesthetist, or clinical nurse specialist).
  • The Post-Master's curriculum provides a minimum of 500 practice hours. (All DNP graduates must complete a minimum of 500 hours. Students who completed less than 500 hours in the master's program will have to complete additional practice hours at the DNP level to meet the 1000 hour minimum).

Scholarly Project and Advisory Committee

The final DNP Scholarly Project must make a significant impact on nursing practice and health outcomes of populations and communities, demonstrate an evidence-based contribution to existing nursing knowledge, and be suitable for peer-reviewed presentation or publication. DNP students should identify a faculty chair and two committee members no later than the completion of NUR 8153 APRN Clinical Immersion for BSN-DNP students and NUR 6163 NUR 6153 DNP Practicum II for Post Master's students. This team is known as the Scholarly Project Advisory Committee. The Committee must approve the Scholarly Project plan and supervise all stages of its implementation. Students may not graduate until the Committee has approved the completion of the Scholarly Project and students have met all other University and DNP graduation requirements. Students who have completed all other DNP course work must maintain registration in NUR 8504 Scholarly Project Completion each semester until graduation.

Health Requirements and Limitations

Professional nursing students are responsible for their own health and for the health of others with whom they come in contact. The following policies have been created to protect both the student and clients. Students are responsible for timely updates of their health care records according to the prescribed schedule. In order to successfully complete the nursing program, students must be able to perform the following essential abilities:

Observation/Sensation

Nursing students must be able to observe and sense the client's current physical, psychological, developmental, spiritual, and sociocultural health care status as well as client responses to nursing interventions. Vision, hearing, and other sensory perceptions are necessary for this ability.

Communication

Nursing students must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written forms with clients and the health care team members. Communication in nursing includes the ability to gather assessment data, provide effective teaching, and provide emotional support for all clients.

Motor

Nursing students must have sufficient motor function to elicit information from clients by palpation, percussion, auscultation, diagnostic maneuvers, and comfort/positioning measures. They must be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general nursing care and emergency treatments. Such actions require moderate motor strength, equilibrium, gross and fine muscle movement coordination, and functional use of touch and vision senses.

Intellectual

Nursing students must have the ability to accurately measure, calculate, reason, and analyze. In addition they must be able to synthesize and apply complex information. Students must be fully alert and attentive at all times when caring for clients and communicating with health care team members. Each student must demonstrate mastery of these skills and possess the ability to incorporate new information from peers, professors, and the nursing and medical literature to formulate sound judgment in patient assessment, intervention, evaluation, and teaching and setting of short- and long-term goals.

Behavioral/Social

Nursing students must possess of level of emotional health that allows full utilization of intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, prompt completion of all responsibilities, attention to the nursing diagnoses and subsequent patient care, and the development of mature, empathetic and effective nurse-client relationships. Students must be able to function effectively under stress. The student must be able to adapt to changing environments, display flexibility, accept and integrate constructive criticism given in classroom and clinical settings, effectively interact in the clinical setting with other members of the healthcare team, and learn to function cooperatively and efficiently in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice.

The student must be able to adapt to and function effectively in stressful situations in both classroom and clinical settings, including emergency situations.

Students with Disabilities

Students admitted to the PBASON must be able to fully perform the essential nursing functions in each of the following five categories: observation/sensation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. Degrees of ability vary widely among individuals. SON faculty will consider candidates with any form of properly disclosed and documented disability on an individual basis. Students with documented special needs must contact both the Dean of the School of Nursing and the University Accommodations for Students with Disabilities designate. Palm Beach Atlantic University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities through established University policies and procedures.

Progression Policies

Some didactic courses require a clinical co-requisite course that must be successfully completed together. (For example: NUR 7033 Management I: Acute and Chronic Health Problems and its corresponding clinical course NUR 7053 Management I: Acute and Chronic Health Problems Clinical.)

  • If a student withdraws from a didactic course, the student must also withdraw from the clinical course.
  • If a student withdraws from a clinical course, the student must also withdraw from the didactic course.
  • If a student is unsuccessful in a didactic course but is passing the clinical course, the student will receive a W in the clinical course.
  • If a student is unsuccessful in a clinical course but is passing the didactic course, the student will receive a W in the didactic course.

If five years have elapsed since a nurse practitioner track student has taken Advanced Health Assessment, Advanced Pathophysiology, or Advanced Pharmacotherapy, retaking the course is recommended. Retaking the course is mandatory after seven years.

Programs

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